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Plasticity Texas Press Information

Plasticity Forum is open to innovators, entrepreneurs, industry leaders, packaging producers, recyclers, waste-to-fuel companies, brand leaders, retailers and manufacturers, educators, think tanks, government agencies, designers and investors.

This year’s speakers include industry leaders from As You Sow, Chevron Phillips Chemical Company, Dell, Morgan Stanley and others.

Plasticity Texas Press Information

Opportunities for Plastics in a Circular World

As world population increases, so does the consumption of resources as economies expand. Without arguing about whether some or all of these resources are finite, it is clear to many that to the extent we can recover material which has become waste after its initial use, the more likely we are to sustainably carry out those activities of consumption in the years to come.

Plastic is one material that binds our planet, both figuratively, in terms of packaging and widespread use in so many industries, but also in the way that when it becomes waste: it is shown to be present in most corners of the world. Plastic can be made from many non-petroleum sources, including even carbon dioxide, so some might suggest that this material is not under the immediate pressure facing many other resources.

Opportunities for Plastics in a Circular World

Plastic Opportunities for Change

Whether or not the ocean and our waters upstream are drivers for needed improvements in plastic pollution reduction, the health of our communities, and the customers we all need, should be incentive enough to demand and encourage management to really focus on being an active participant in the circular economy. Plastic pollution is now on the top of many environmental agendas, as it directly impacts the abilities of cities to be resilient, and “smart.” Governments can facilitate circularity and waste avoidance, but it is the private sector which will thrive on it once some good case studies are promoted, scaled and replicated.

Plastic Opportunities for Change

Our Plastic World: Policy and Legislation

This is the third piece in a three-part series about recycling and the efforts of the” Plasticity Forum”:http://www.plasticityforum.com.

By now, you likely know a thing or two about Plasticity Forum. As plastic pollution continues, thinkers and entrepreneurs are grouping together to seek an end to one of human’s greatest dilemmas and to create new means for tidying up the planet.

Two weeks ago, we introduced you to the notions of economy and how plastic is recovered. Then, we talked about plastic’s design, and now, we’ll focus on legislation and policy. The time has come to examine what rules (if any) exist to stop plastic pollution from spreading across the globe….

Our Plastic World: Policy and Legislation

Our Plastic World: Designed for Reuse, But Often Tossed Aside

Last week, we introduced you to the Plasticity Forum, an organization that works to bring designers, innovators, economists and all-around thinkers to the table to discuss plastic pollution and what should be done about it. Economy and recovery were our previous topics. This week, we’ll examine plastic design and how it’s being used for more environmentally friendly missions.

Pre-Designed for Recyclability

As mentioned in part one, plastic is an inexpensive material that allows manufacturers to safely package their products while saving money. Nothing wrong with putting cheap materials to good use, except our lack of recycling efforts have led to some nasty repercussions, especially when one considers where plastic comes from.

Our Plastic World: Designed for Reuse, But Often Tossed Aside

Plasticity Forums Return to the U.S. This Spring

With growing focus on plastic pollution and the challenges it presents, the Plasticity Forum brings together motivated, like-minded experts from across the plastics spectrum to discuss the opportunities that can result as solutions are introduced. Plasticity convenes leaders to share information, network, and primarily discuss best practices about scalable, innovative solutions to reduce the waste footprint left by plastics in our communities and environment. It attracts high-level participants from brand owners, plastics product makers, NGOs, resin and biomaterial suppliers, educators, designers, recyclers, consultants and more.

Plasticity Forums Return to the U.S. This Spring

Our Plastic World: Promoting Sustainability Through a Circular Economy

This is the first piece in a three-part series about recycling and the efforts of the Plasticity Forum.

Plastic is everywhere: in our homes, our offices, our schools – we can’t seem to get away from it. Even products not made of plastic are usually wrapped in it.

It isn’t all bad. Plastic is a cheap material that allows manufacturers to package merchandise with ease while saving money. Lower costs mean companies can charge less. This stimulates spending and keeps our economy healthy. But recycling is also economically feasible, and we’re just not doing it enough.

Our Plastic World: Promoting Sustainability Through a Circular Economy

Plasticity Event Draws Recyclers and Designers

Plasticity London – Designers are arguably one of the missing links to solving some of the complex solutions related to plastic pollution – designing for recycling, and societal process flow in terms of resource recovery. Those who know the issues will be better able to drive expansion of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) and UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) that many of the brands and clients they work for are striving to meet.

Plasticity Event Draws Recyclers and Designers

Plastic Waste crisis unites designers and plastics experts at London forum

The Plasticity Forum in London included a unique range of global expert speakers on the topic of plastic sustainability, with challenges and opportunities that included the manufacturing needs for an innovative single-material shampoo bottle, the use of calcium carbonate from large volumes of egg shells as a filler for any types of polymers which can benefit from its inclusion. Giulio Bonazzi, chairman and CEO of Italy’s Aquafil Group, spoke about his firm’s unique fiber recycling capacities from carpet tiles and used fishing nets. Aquafil has a growing program with carpet maker Interface, which sources fishing nets from local communities in the Philippines and Cameron. Mr. Bonazzi, and Miriam Turner from Interface said that “over 100 tons of nets have been collected, with over 55,000 families impacted by a cleaner environment, and over 600 families now having access to micro finance as a result of the Net-Works program.”

Plastic Waste crisis unites designers and plastics experts at London forum
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